Articles Tagged with United States

More than 5 million people currently live with Alzheimer’s disease, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. This degenerative disease causes declines in memory and cognitive ability. Medications may relieve some symptoms, but the disease is progressive and has no known cure. Victims with advanced Alzheimer’s eventually lose awareness of their environments and the ability to look after themselves.

The financial burden of Alzheimer’s can be significant. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, the disease is the most expensive medical condition in America. Victims and their family members may have to pay for medication, medical attention and caregiving. Victims may be able to reduce this burden by seeking Social Security Disability benefits.

Qualifying for benefits 

Over the years, military servicemen and women have put their lives on the line, have been exposed to deadly toxins and have suffered injuries in a desire to keep those back home safe. As many of these veterans age, they find themselves struggling with serious health concerns as well as disabling conditions. These conditions can leave veterans struggling financially and for many, the long wait associated with applying for Social Security Disability may put them in dire straits.

Wounded warriors

The Social Security Administration has set up a wounded warriors program to assist military members who are disabled. The program applies to people who have suffered a disabling injury after October 2001. While it does not guarantee automatic approval on disability applications, the program does move those applications to the top of the pile, ensuring that military members receive an answer on their application at a faster rate than other applicants – sometimes in a matter of days.

Individuals dealing with mental health issues in Illinois can apply for benefits from the Social Security Administration’s disability program. Benefits may help to alleviate the strain brought about by an inability to get or keep a job due to mental illness.

Recognized types of mental illnesses

The National Institute of Mental Health estimates that 26.2 percent of adults in the U.S. have a diagnosable mental disorder each year. The number of individuals with severe mental disorders is smaller, at just less than 6 percent.

Drunk driving is an ongoing issue in many states throughout the U.S. Due to the slowed reflexes, impaired judgment and other effects that alcohol intoxication can cause, there are a significant number of motor vehicle accidents involving drunk drivers. According to the National Transportation Safety Board, 20 people are injured and one person is killed each hour in alcohol-related collisions.

In an effort to reduce the number of accidents related to alcohol impairment, a number of new technologies are being researched, developed and tested. The goal of these technologies is to prevent a person, who is intoxicated, from getting behind the wheel and driving by reliably and accurately measuring blood alcohol content, while not interfering with a driver that is sober. The types of technology being developed include:

Advanced breath tests 

Although advancements have been made in medical care, doctors continue to misdiagnose patients at an alarming rate. In developed nations, as many as 15 percent of medical cases are not diagnosed properly, according to The American Journal of Medicine. Tens of thousands of people lose their lives in American hospitals on an annual basis because of this issue and far more suffer from a devastating injury.

When people are misdiagnosed, they can be exposed to unnecessary and even harmful health care. For example, misdiagnosed psychological issues could result in the prescription of dangerous drugs, whereas cancer misdiagnosis could cause someone to undergo needless chemotherapy. In addition, diagnostic errors can delay proper treatment, especially when people have a serious disease or fatal condition that has been diagnosed as a different illness.

Potential consequences of a misdiagnosis